What's On

List of forthcoming events for The Arts Society Richmond:

Lecture of the magic of Prague: Czech art and culture

Duke Street Church

04 February 2020 -
19:00

£5 payable on the door. No ticket needed.  Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm.

Lecture outline
As part of the Habsburg Empire, Prague was beloved of kings and princes. During the 19th century, however, the Czechs sought to reclaim the city for their own. Looking back at ancient mythology, they imagined a new future by means of art, architecture, literature and music. From Romanticism to cubism, the Czechs re-conceived various artistic movements in specifically patriotic ways. Looking at painter and decorative artist Alfons Mucha, artist Karel Svoboda and composers Bedřich Smetana and Antonín Dvořák, this talk shows how the Czechs created a capital that was fit for a new independent nation.

Speaker's Profile
Our speaker, Gavin Plumley, is a writer and broadcaster who has appeared on BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4 and has contributed to newspapers, magazines and opera and concert programmes worldwide. He lectures widely about the culture of Central Europe during the 19th and 20th centuries. Recently he has given talks to the Royal Opera House, the National Gallery, the National Trust, the National Theatre, the British Museum, the V&A, the Southbank Centre, the Tate and the Neue Galerie, New York, as well as for history of art societies and The Art Fund. 


Lecture on the English domestic revival: country house architecture of the late 19th century

Duke Street Church

03 March 2020 -
19:00

£5 payable on the door. No ticket needed.  Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm.

Lecture outline
A renewed interest in English rural architecture and an anti-Gothic backlash led to the ‘English Domestic Revival’. Inspired by English farmhouse architecture and the work of Inigo Jones and Sir Christopher Wren, a range of houses and public buildings were erected in the last decades of the 19th century by Norman Shaw, Nesfield, Lutyens and other architects of the late 19th century. 

Speaker's Profile
Our speaker, Christoper Rogers, read Geography at Oxford and taught Geography. Formerly he was Head of Geography at Downe House School Newbury. He became interested in country house architecture whilst at Oxford and he has lectured on the subject ever since. He has regularly led 5-day summer courses for Marlborough College Summer School. Chris also lectures for the National Trust.


Lecture on Eric Ravilios, Edward Bawden and the Great Bardfield Artists

Duke Street Church

07 April 2020 -
20:00

Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm. Free entry. No ticket needed.

Description

In 1932 the artist Edward Bawden and his wife Charlotte moved into Brick House in the Essex village of Great Bardfield, initially sharing the house with another artistic couple, Eric Ravilious and Tirzah Garwood. It was to be the beginning of a fascinating artistic community. In the years before and during the Second World War painters, printmakers and designers settled in the village, relishing the peace while remaining within easy reach of London.

While Bawden and Ravilious saw active service as War Artists (Ravilious dying in 1942), other artists captured the soon-to-change world of rural England through the Recording Britain project. By the mid-1950s a diverse, innovative but highly creative group had made Bardfield their home – much to the bemusement of the local villagers, who found the complex relationships and artistic focus of the newcomers rather baffling.

In 1954 the artists invited the public into their homes and studios to see their work, starting the increasingly popular ‘Open Studios’ movement that now covers the country, and persuading some of their neighbours that artists could be quite normal people after all

Speaker's Profile
Jo Walton has combined teaching and lecturing with a career in art bookselling and has been a volunteer guide at both Tate Britain and Tate Modern. She is now a freelance lecturer for The Arts Society, the Art Fund, and Friends of Dulwich Picture Gallery and local art societies.


Lecture on Hogarth - Free entry

Duke Street Church

05 May 2020 -
20:00

Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm. Free entry. No ticket needed.

This is a “Bring friends free” evening. Come along for a free lecture even if you don’t know anybody. We will make you very welcome.

Description

Hogarth brings pots, crocks and all manner of chinaware onto his stage as bitpart players in his social dramas. From the Harlot’s dingy garret to milord’s swanky mantelpiece, ceramics teeter, tumble, or merely stand helplessly by, symbolic commentators on the goings-on around them. We delve into the stories, we reveal and even identify particular ceramics and show how Hogarth’s images themselves became sources for the ceramic workshops of Europe and China. A unique and stimulating talk colliding material culture and moral commentary. You will look at Hogarth and ceramics with new eyes. 

Speaker's Profile
Lars Tharp is a ceramics as well as a Hogarth specialist. Most of his current talks focus on the European and the East-West China trade and the material world of the 17th and 18th century. He is a regular lecturer and broadcaster and leads occasional tours to China. Born in Copenhagen, he read Archaeology at Cambridge, was at Sothebys for sixteen years, and is today London’s Foundling Museum’s ‘Hogarth Ambassador’. He holds an Honorary Doctorate in Art, is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and sits on the court of The Company of Weavers, London’s oldest guild. He has served twice on the Art Fund’s Annual Prize to Museums and Galleries. He has presented numerous programmes on TV and radio and writes on many subjects, is passionate about music.


Lecture on the Last Supper in Pompeii

Duke Street Church

02 June 2020 -
20:00

Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm. £5 payable on the door. No ticket needed.

Description

For the Romans, life meant getting together to eat and drink in a pub or at a banquet.  "Last Supper in Pompeii" celebrates the Roman love affair with food and drink – a journey, from fields and vineyards to markets and shops, from tables to toilets and the tomb. 

We see the influence of the Greeks and mysterious Etruscans, and  visit fertile Vesuvius to see how Romans got their food and drink (and a Roman vineyard buried in AD79!).  Into the bustling city, past hawkers, shops and bars we enter the house, visit the shrine of the gods (with a chicken!) and the gorgeous garden with its flowers and fountains.   We recline in the dining room, with exotic food and fine wine, and surrounded by Greek-style luxury – fine silver, mosaics and frescoes.

Dare we see the kitchen? No fridge, no running water, no hygiene –  and there is the toilet, feeding into a cess pit below. Escape to Roman Britain with objects from sheepy Chedworth and metropolitan London with the first brewer, the first cooper and even the first pub landlord! Finally we see the monuments of the dead feasting into the afterlife. Seize the day –  Carpe diem!!

Speaker's Profile
Dr Paul Roberts is the newly appointed Sackler Keeper of Antiquities at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford University. From 1994 to 2014 he was Senior Roman Curator in the Department of Greece and Rome at the British Museum, where he was the driving force behind the major exhibition Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum. At the Ashmolean he worked on an exhibition for 2016 Storms, War and Shipwrecks: Sicily and the Sea– telling the history of Sicily through shipwreck finds around the island. He studied at the Universities of Cambridge, Sheffield and Oxford and lived in Italy for several years, in Milan, Rome and Naples. He has excavated in Britain, Greece, Libya, Turkey and in particular Italy, where he directs excavations in the Sabine hills near Rome. His research focuses on the day-to-day lives of ordinary people in the Greek and Roman worlds. He has accompanied tours to Sicily, the Bay of Naples and Rome and has written books on Roman daily life, Roman Emperors, mummy portraits and Roman glass. He is currently writing a walking tour of Ancient Rome.


Lecture on The Bayeaux Tapestry

Duke Street Church

07 July 2020 -
19:30

Drinks from 7pm, AGM at 7.30pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm. £5 payable on the door. No ticket needed.

Description

Commissioned by the Bishop of Bayeux who fought at Hastings and made by skilled English craftsmen, the Bayeux Tapestry is the last survivor of a vanished art form. Rupert presents a lively introduction to the tapestry – so much more than the story of Hastings – in which he unravels some of its mysteries, places it in the context of its age and firmly establishes it as a landmark in the history of Western art. With its lively illustrations of languid, party-loving, moustachioed Englishmen, of the cavalcades of noble huntsmen and of the snorting Norman cavalry poised to charge into battle, the tapestry is the next best thing to a moving picture from the time. 

Speaker's Profile
Rupert Willoughby is a prize-winning historian who specialises in the domestic and social life of the past. He read History at the University of London and is the author of the best-selling Life in Medieval England, of guides to castles owned by English Heritage and Hampshire County Council, and of a series of popular histories of places, including Chawton: Jane Austen’s Village and Basingstoke and its Contribution to World Culture. He contributes regular obituaries to The Times and The Daily Telegraph, writes privately-commissioned histories of houses, and is an experienced lecturer – and occasional broadcaster – on a broad range of topics, with a particular interest in architecture, interior decoration and costume.


Lecture on Charles Mackie, a Good Friend of Edward Hornel

Duke Street Church

04 August 2020 -
20:00

Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm. £5 payable on the door. No ticket needed.

Description

The Scottish artist Charles H. Mackie RSA RSW was a good friend to Edward Hornel, now better known as one of the ‘Glasgow Boys’. Kirkcudbright proved a source of inspiration to both artists and their correspondence sheds light on this overlooked friendship. The Galloway countryside was the subject of the murals he executed for Patrick Geddes at Ramsay Garden in Edinburgh. Going further afield,visits to Brittany and Paris brought Mackie into contact with artists such as Paul Sérusier and the Nabis in Paris. He was shown round Gauguin’s studio by the artist himself and brought the first Vuillard painting back to Scotland. His travels in France and Italy are reflected in the art he produce and the range of media he embraced:oil,watercolour woodblock prints, tooled leatherwork and sculpture. The forthcoming anniversary of his death will be the occasion for a major retrospective exhibition of his work at the City Art Centre in Edinburgh.

Speaker's Profile
Pat Clark was a teacher of history and politics for over 30 years and was latterly an ISI Inspector and Headteacher of a secondary school. In 2004-2006 she appointed as VSO Education Adviser to an non-governmental organsiation (NGO) in Cambodia. Her lectures to Khmer colleagues, fellow volunteers, sister NGOs and representatives from the Ministry of Education widened her experience. Following the publication of her book People, Places and Piazzas. The Life and Art of Charles Mackie in 2016 she has lectured to audiences in Perth, Edinburgh, Bearsden, Dunfermline, Falkirk and Kirkcudbright as well as the Staithes Art Festival. In May 2019 she gave the Annual Edinburgh Philosophical Institution Lecture.


Lecture on the Art of Illusion - Free Entry

Duke Street Church

01 September 2020 -
20:00

Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm. Free entry. No ticket needed.

This is a “Bring friends free” evening. Come along for a free lecture even if you don’t know anybody. We will make you very welcome.

Description
From the beginning of time the fascination with magic and the impossible has been widespread. Egypt was the cradle of magic. Sorcerer Priests used scientific principles to create illusions for the edification of worship and to hold power over the people. Where there was power there was magic. Then there is the age-old skill of sleight of hand, which proves that ‘the hand is quicker than the eye’. Magicians were known as ‘Jongleurs’ lest they be sentenced to death for ‘witchraft and conjuration’ under the edicts of Henry VIII.

With the emergence of the Music Hall, Magic gained a new respectability and audiences flocked in their thousands to watch the extraordinary feats of The Great Illusionists. This gave birth to legendary tricks such as pulling a rabbit from a hat and sawing a lady in half. And if magicians guarded their secrets with their lives, how was the Magic Circle formed ? – Home to 10,000 secrets.

Even Today in our super technical age of ipods and broadband, the wonder and surprise of magic are as popular as ever, not forgetting the Harry Potter craze.

‘Wonder Workers and the Art of Illusion’ is a whistle stop tour of the history of mystery from 3000 BC to the 21st century and be careful! – you might be amazed and bewitched.

Profile
Bertie Pearce read Drama at Manchester University and has a Diplome Internationale from the L’École Internationale de Théâtre Jacques Lecoq in Paris. He is a member of the Inner Magic Circle with Gold Star. He lectures and performs on cruise ships and to U3A, historical societies, festivals, schools and colleges. He has also toured the world with a magic cabaret show and a one man show entitled All Aboard. He has written articles for newspapers and magazines on entertainment and theatre.


Talk on 150 years of London Underground Design

Duke Street Church

06 October 2020 -
20:00

£5 payable on the door. No ticket needed.  Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm.

Lecture outline
This lecture overs surprising attempts to create some graphic unity, even in the 1860s and 70s. Our speaker, Mark Ovenden, discusses the expansion of the London Underground and the need to create some cohesion between the different operating companies, Leslie Green’s architecture. He covers many subjects, including the Arts & Crafts movement, Frank Pick, Edward Johnston’s typeface, Charles Holden’s architecture and the Streamline Moderne/Art Deco movement, the New Works Programme, post war austerity and design, the Victoria Line, the loss of Johnston and its rescue by Kono, the Jubilee Line Extension and its architecture, the creation of TfL, recent schemes and future works including the Elizabeth Line/Northern Line extension to Battersea.

Profile
Mark is a broadcaster and author who specialises in the subjects of graphic design, cartography and architecture in public transport, with an emphasis on underground rapid transit.

His first book Metro Maps of the World published in 2003 is a guide to the diagrams, plans and maps of underground rapid transit system including images ranging from photos of the systems to rare and historical maps. Paris Metro Style in map and station design was published November 2008. Railway Maps of the World was published in May 2011 in the USA, a British edition was produced in September 2011. London Underground by Design was published by Penguin Books in January 2013. A celebration of the Johnston typeface centenary and 90th Anniversary of Gill Sans was published in 2016, and in July 2017 Mark fronted a television documentary for BBC Four on the subject of Johnston and Gill and in November 2018 he presented a documentary for BBC Radio 4 on skyscrapers.


From Tabards to Tailoring - Lecture

Duke Street Church

03 November 2020 -
20:00

£5 payable on the door. No ticket needed.  Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm.

Lecture outline
By 2020 the global menswear industry is expected to be worth $33 billion. This illustrated lecture unpicks the social and political threads that hold the male wardrobe together by considering changing attitudes across the ages. It identifies key individuals from Beau Brummell to Edward VII and important periods of transition from the Restoration of Britain’s monarchy in 1660 to the ‘Youthquake’ that occurred after the Second World War. Following a timeline and explaining sartorial developments in conjunction with social and political changes, the lecture shows how men’s clothing, even thoughts on what it means to be male, has been in constant evolution. This remains so today.  

Speaker's Profile
Benjamin Wild is a cultural historian who writes and lectures about the history of dress. He convenes courses for the Victoria & Albert Museum and is a teacher of history at Sherborne School. He is half of the Dress:Fancy podcast (the other half being Lucy Clayton), a weekly show that discusses the prevalence, power and popularity of fancy dress costume. Previously, he was guest lecturer at the Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design and consultant lecturer at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art. He has written for a variety of magazines and academic journals and regularly talks at the National Portrait Gallery and the Royal Academy.

Benjamin read History at King’s College London. His doctorate, focusing on the material culture of the household of King Henry III of England, was published in 2012. His second book, A Life in Fashion: The Wardrobe of Cecil Beaton, was published in 2016. His next book is called Carnival to Catwalk: Global Reflections on Fancy Dress Costume


Talk on The Magic of Pantomime

Duke Street Church

01 December 2020 -
20:00

£5 payable on the door. No ticket needed.  Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm. Free Christmas drinks and mince pies after the lecture

Lecture outline
The history of this enduring and peculiarly British institution, from its origins in 16th century Italian commedia dell’arte, through the influence of 19th century music hall, to the family shows that are still much loved today. On the way we examine the origins of some of the stories used in pantomime as well as such traditions as the (female) principal boy and the (male) pantomime dame. The talk is interspersed with personal anecdotes from the speaker’s years of working (and appearing) professionally in pantomime.

Speaker's Profile
Ian Gledhill has had a very varied career, from designing underground railways as an engineer for London Transport to appearing in pantomime with Julian Clary.  In between he has worked in travel and tourism, music publishing, television, and especially the theatre where he has been an actor, director, set designer, stage manager and opera translator. His main interests include architecture, history, transport and classical music, especially opera and operetta. He began giving lectures in 1997 and now gives on average around 140 a year. 


What's on

Today

24

This month

Jan

Where

Arts Richmond Events

Wednesday 1 April 2020 - Monday 3 February 2020

The Diana Armfield Drawing Competition

more details >

Arts Richmond Artist of the Year

Saturday 30 May 2020

Artist of the Year 2020

more details >